Courses I Teach

 

HIST&136 History of the United States to 1877 (5)

A chronological and thematic study of U.S. history from Native America to Reconstruction with emphasis on its cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social elements. Mandatory decimal grading. (hybrid and online)

 

HIST& 137 History of the United States Since 1877 (5)

A chronological and thematic study of U.S. history from the end of Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on its cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social elements. Mandatory decimal grading. (hybrid and online)

 

HIST& 146 U.S. History I: Early America to 1800 (5)

Chronological and thematic study of U.S. history from Early America to 1800 with emphasis on its cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social elements. Major topics: indigenous societies, European conquest and colonization, ethnic and religious diversity, slavery, the American Revolution, the U.S. Constitution, and republicanism. Prerequisite: Concurrent or successful completion of ENGL& 101 recommended. Mandatory decimal grading. (hybrid and online)

 

HIST& 147 U.S. History II: Nineteenth Century (5)

Chronological and thematic study of U.S. History from 1800 to 1900 with emphasis on its cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social elements. Major topics: republicanism, westward expansion, slavery and abolitionism, social and political reform, Civil War, Reconstruction, Indian policy, industrialism, immigration and urbanization. Prerequisite: Concurrent or successful completion of ENGL& 101 is recommended. Mandatory decimal grading. (hybrid and online)

 

HIST& 148 U.S. History III: Twentieth Century (5)

Chronological and thematic study of U.S. history from 1900 to the present with emphasis on its cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social elements. Major topics: cultural and technological modernization, First and Second World Wars, economic prosperity and depression, social and political reform, multiculturalism, and globalization. Prerequisite: Concurrent or successful completion of ENGL& 101 is recommended. Mandatory decimal grading. (hybrid and online)

 

HIST& 214/HIST& 214W Pacific Northwest History (5)

A chronological and thematic approach to Pacific Northwest history (focused on Washington and Oregon but including areas from the Pacific Coast to the Rocky Mountains and from northern California to southern Alaska). It will emphasize cultural, economic, environmental, ethnic, political, and social topics. Formerly History 267. Prerequisite: Concurrent or successful completion of ENLG& 101 recommended. Mandatory decimal grading. (hybrid and online)

 

HIST& 215/HIST& 215 W U.S. Women's History (5)

Examines U.S. History from pre-colonial times to the present from the perspectives of women of various racial, ethnic, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds, and explores how women helped shape U.S. history. Topics may include colonization, slavery, wars, western migration, employment, immigration, reform, and gender. Dual listed as G&WS 240/G&WS 240W. (hybrid and online)

 

HIST 245 History of American Immigration (5)

Multicultural study of immigration to the United States from the era of colonization to the present. Examination of the process of immigration and adaptation to life in the U.S., as well as reaction to immigrants by native-born Americans. Focus includes Asia, European, Latin American, and contemporary African immigrants. Dual listed as IASTU 245. Prerequisites: Concurrent or successful completion of ENGL& 101 is recommended. Mandatory decimal grading. (hybrid and online) Meets Multicultural Core Course requirement for Shoreline associate degrees.

 

HISTORY 295/295W Special Topics in History (5)

Introduction to selected sub-specialties within the discipline. Each course will focus on a single issue area and/or topic and will employ techniques and concepts of history. (hybrid and online) Previously HIST 285/HIST 285W.

 

Interdisciplinary Studies

IDS 101 Americans at War (10)
HIST& 136 AND ENGL& 101 OR ENGL 276

Despite Americans' belief in their own peace-loving natures, America's origins and American identity are inextricably linked to warfare. From the earliest encounters between European settlers and the native peoples of North America to the bloody era of Civil War and Reconstruction, Americans defended their territory and defined their values through armed conflict. In this course, we will explore how and why Americans have resorted to war, as well as how war has shaped Americans' experiences of gender, race, class, and region. Through reading, critical thinking, and writing, students will examine early American historical events, documents, and literary works that reveal the ways in which Americans experienced and understood warfare. (hybrid)

 

IDS 101 Rebellious Americans (10)
HIST& 136 AND ENGL& 101 OR ENGL 276

In this course, we will investigate various meanings of rebellion in what would become the United States from early European colonization through the Civil War. We also will explore subtle forms of resistance to

authority that on the surface do not fit traditional definitions of rebellion. (hybrid)

 

IDS 101 To Speak and Be Heard, Fighting for Rights in America (10)
HIST& 137 AND ENGL& 102 OR ENGL 276

What does it mean to have rights in America? Who defines these rights? How did we get them? How do we keep them? This class explores the social, political, and cultural restrictions and extensions of rights in the U.S. from 1877 to the present day. (hybrid)