treeThe Listening Tree Project

 

The mission of The Listening Tree Project (LTP) is to promote a campus climate of equality, justice, and respect for all people, and facilitate student leadership development. We participate in problem-solving around issues that traditionally have made education and the delivery of services difficult for all students, faculty, and staff, but especially for those of color, women, differently-abled people, religious minorities, LGBTQ people, immigrants and international students, and low-income people. LTP may be defined in terms of intercultural communication, multicultural understanding, and global awareness, all of which fall under the umbrella term of internationalization.

 

News: Federal grant grows Listening Tree Project

 

Listening Tree Project skit:

Photo Slideshow

 

Song inspired by LTP


Project Contact:

Sarah Zale

 

Library Learning Guide for Listening Tree Project

LTP uses:

  • community-building exercises to develop social connections among participants
  • compassionate listening to hone skills for thoughtfully considering multicultural perspectives
  • interactive theater to facilitate discussion around issues of conflict in a multi-ethnic and multi-culturally diverse and global world.

Participants:

  • compare and contrast cultures in order to respond artistically and think critically with a global perspective
  • demonstrate awareness and knowledge of the interdependence of nations concerning issues of peace and prosperity, and power and privilege
  • practice ways to communicate their ideas and take action to share their learning.

 

The project runs three consecutive quarters, fall to spring, each school year. It is housed within the Equity and Social Justice Program of the Social Sciences division.

 

 

LTP admits 25 students. They enroll in one class (directly related to the project) each quarter for a three-quarter year. In an interview process, student applicants to the project must demonstrate leadership potential and an interest in exploring issues related to identity, community, power and oppression, peace and prosperity, global competence, and social responsibility. Students completing the program will see themselves as Student Educators who possess skills enabling them to address difficult, and potentially emotional, social issues, as well as respond to concerns relating to a an increasingly global world. The program is rigorous and expectations are high. As a result, the rewards for Student Educators, in academia and the workplace are limitless.