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* Olympia looking for colleges to work together

Whether unanticipated budget language that could combine Cascadia Community College and Lake Washington Technical College passes or not, it certainly indicates the mood of lawmakers in Olympia.

 

“The Legislature is clearly looking to the community and technical college system for increased efficiencies as they grapple with the continuing budget problems,” said Shoreline Community College President Lee Lambert on Friday, Feb. 26, 2010. “That’s exactly what we’re doing with our recently announced collaboration with Lake Washington for institutional-research services. By working together, both schools will be better able to serve students.”

 

Lambert added that Shoreline’s partnership with LWTC is not in jeopardy. “We’ll continue to work together,” he said.

 

According to news reports, the surprise budget proviso involving Cascadia, LWTC and the UW-Bothell, came from Rep. Mark Ericks, D-Bothell, who represents the district that contains Cascadia. Ericks has since said that he would withdraw the proviso if a bill calling for a system-wide efficiency study is passed into law. As of Feb. 26, that bill, SB 6359, had passed the Senate on a 47-1 vote and was waiting to be scheduled for a vote on the floor of the House. Assuming passage, the next step would be Gov. Chris Gregoire’s desk.

 

Lambert noted that on Jan. 15, Shoreline testified in favor of SB 6359’s companion bill on the House side, HB 2634. “We support the idea of finding ways to help students,” he said. “If we can get better services or less costly services through collaboration and other approaches, we should look for those opportunities.”

 

The bills’ main sponsors, Sen. Derek Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor, and Rep. Reuven Carlyle, D-Seattle, each spoke at a Jan. 25 statewide meeting of CTC trustees in Olympia.

SCC/Jim Hills

* Author of best-seller, “Brain Rules,” Dr. John Medina to speak

John Medina, author of the New York Times best-seller, Brain Rules, will speak at Shoreline Community College at 7 p.m., Tuesday, March 23, 2010 in the Campus Theater.  Sponsored by the college’s Parent Education Program Parent Advisory Council, ticket prices are only $5. Cash or check at door. 

 

How do we learn? What exactly do sleep and stress do to our brains? Why is multi-tasking a myth? Why is it so easy to forget—and so important to repeat new knowledge? Is it true that men and women have different brains? Medina will talk about his lifelong interest in how the brain works and how it influences the way we teach our children. 

 

A developmental molecular biologist, Medina says his goal for writing Brain Rules was to share things that scientists know about how the brain works, he calls them Brain Rules, to present the science for each rule and then to offer ideas for investigating how the rule might apply to our daily lives, especially at work and school. 

 

While the information in Brain Rules applies to people of all ages, the particular focus of this lecture will be on brain development in infants and young children.  Members of the Parent Advisory Council chose Dr. Medina as the speaker for their annual program, because they thought that the information would be of great interest to parents whose children are enrolled in parent cooperative preschools that are affiliated with the college.

 

Medina is an affiliate professor of bioengineering at the University of Washington School of Medicine and is the director of the Brain Center for Applied Learning Research at Seattle Pacific University.

 

Copies of Brain Rules will be for sale at the lecture.  Special seating will be available for parents with infants under six months.  No other children, please.

 

Shoreline Community College is located at 16101 Greenwood Avenue North, just west of Aurora Avenue and north of Seattle city limits.

 

For maps and driving directions, visit www.shoreline.edu/collegemaps.

 

 

* GAC & International Programs Symposium on International Humanitarian Assistance

The four-day symposium on international humanitarian assistance is off and running. 

Four Days to Change the World at SCC by Shoreline Community CollegeOn Monday, February 22, Arlene Mitchell, Senior Program Officer for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and former UN World Food Program Executive, kicked of the symposium.  Mitchell stimulated conversation among the community members and faculty and staff following her presentation with critical observations revolving around topics such  competition among aid agencies, both governmental and non-governmental, and not enough cooperation; the distinction between development and humanitarian assistance possibly being arbitrary and harmful to developing countries; the importance of agriculture and women being central to reducing poverty; and that there is a role for anyone who wants to get involved (as long as it does not involve creating another non-governmental organization (there are already too many). More photos.  (Photos by Jim Hills)

"It was a good event," said Larry Fuell, Director of the Global Affairs Center. "Arlene Mitchell of the Gates Foundation offered an excellent review of her 40 years of experience of national and international governance and ended with four critical observations that stimulated a lively discussion." 

IMG_2688 by Shoreline Community CollegeOn Tuesday night, attendance was sparse, but the presentation by Heidi Peterson of CARE was good and the questions and answers were informative. Peterson said that half of the financial resources that CARE receives come from national governments or international bodies and that this has an impact on the organization's programming decisions. Another topic was about the tension between what donors want to support (when donations are made for a specific purpose) and what recipients say they need.  "CARE regularly asks those they are helping what they need most -- what needs are critical," Fuell said.  More photos.

We are on day three of the symposium now and Fuell has noticed that the presentations have a shared theme.  "Interestingly, all four of the presentations thus far have emphasized the theme of humanitarian assistance aimed particular at helping women and girls," said Fuell, "this was not prearranged as one student asked me after last night."

Don't miss out on the rest of the week's events!

* House, Senate unveil budget proposals

Tea leaves

Here are links to documents about early details and analysis on state budget proposals from the House and Senate:

While Shoreline Community College officials are working toward an expense-reduction plan, lawmakers in Olympia are unveiling new and competing state budgets.

 

“It’s difficult to tell right now just where they’ll end up,” SCC President Lee Lambert said of the separate Senate and House budget plans unveiled Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2010.

 

However, Lambert said it is clear that Shoreline Community College must move ahead with planning for reductions and a March 12 all-campus meeting to announce the plan. “Whatever the final target is going to be, we need to start now to have the reductions in place by July 1,” he said. “Waiting just makes it harder on those who may be impacted and we’d have to cut more.”

 

Both the House and Senate versions of the budget are a combination of expense reductions, federal funds and new taxes:

 

House

  • $641 million in additional federal funds
  • $653 million in budget reductions
  • $547 million in fund transfers
  • $857 million in new revenue (details TBA)

Senate

  • $583 million in additional federal funds
  • $838 million in budget reductions
  • $498 million in fund transfers
  • $918 million in new revenue including a 0.3 % temporary increase in sales tax
* Campus responds with budget ideas

Hundreds of budget-related suggestions have poured in from Shoreline Community College employees over the past week after college officials asked for ideas and input.

 

“There has really been a lot of involvement, really significant,” Daryl Campbell, Vice President for Administrative Services, said of the suggestions that were submitted through department and anonymously through e-mail and suggestion boxes.

 

The suggestion-gathering period is one of the final pieces to be in place before Campbell and the other vice presidents craft a plan that will trim between $1.5 million and $2 million from the college budget for the 2010-11 fiscal year that begins July 1.

 

“We are compiling and categorizing all the comments and we will read all of them before finalizing a plan,” Campbell said, adding that the e-mail and suggestion boxes will be available for the next several weeks. “We’ll continue to look at comments as they come in.”

 

With ultimate approval by SCC President Lee Lambert, that plan will come from Campbell, Vice President for Academic Affairs John Backes, Vice President for Student Success Tonya Drake and Vice President for Human Resources and Employee Relations Stephen Smith. Also participating in the discussions are Holly Woodmansee, Special Assistant to the President for Budget and Internal Control and Jim Hills, Interim Special Assistant to the President for Communications, Marketing and Government Relations.

 

The goal is to announce the reduction plan at an all-campus meeting starting at 12:30 p.m., Friday, March 12. To reach that goal, however, much will have to happen, including finalizing the plan, discussions with both faculty and classified union representatives and private meetings between Lambert and those employees who could be affected by the reductions.

 

While the college will announce a budget-reduction plan on March 12, that doesn’t mean it will be set in stone.

 

“There are a number of things that could change and impact the plan,” Campbell said. Those things include getting a specific budget-cut target from the State Board of Community and Technical Colleges. That can’t happen until the Legislature passes a budget and the session end is scheduled for March 11. Potential federal funding or new state taxes may change the lawmakers’ equation. Personal choices by employees including retirements, resignations and those with position “bumping rights” can also change who is affected by the cuts.

 

Also, there will be an opportunity for those impacted by the cuts to speak again with President Lambert.

 

“A lot of thought and work will have been done by that point, but if there is a compelling reason, or perhaps we just got something wrong, of course we would want to revisit that,” Lambert said. “No one wants to do this, but we do want to do it the best way we can for our employees and students.”

 

Anticipating the likelihood of changes, there will be another all-campus meeting at 12:30 p.m., Friday, April 2, to update the campus on how reductions are being implemented and present any adjustments that are known at that point.

 

SCC/Jim Hills

* Campus responds with budget ideas

Hundreds of budget-related suggestions have poured in from Shoreline Community College employees over the past week after college officials asked for ideas and input.

 

“There has really been a lot of involvement, really significant” Daryl Campbell, Vice President for Administrative Services, said of the suggestions that were submitted anonymously either online or in suggestion boxes.

 

The suggestion-gathering period is one of the final pieces to be in place before Campbell and the other vice presidents craft a plan that will trim between $1.5 million and $2 million from the college budget for the 2010-11 fiscal year that begins July 1.

 

“We are compiling and categorizing all the comments and we will read all of them before finalizing a plan,” Campbell said, adding that the e-mail and suggestion boxes will be available for the next several weeks. “We’ll continue to look at comments.”

 

With ultimate approval by SCC President Lee Lambert, that plan will come from Campbell, Vice President for Academic Affairs John Backes, Vice President for Student Success Tonya Drake and President for Human Resources and Employee Relations Stephen Smith. Also participating in the discussions are Holly Woodmansee, Special Assistant to the President for Budget and Internal Control and Jim Hills, Interim Special Assistant to the President for Communications, Marketing and Government Relations.

 

The goal is to announce the reduction plan at an all-campus meeting starting at 12:30 p.m., Friday, March 12. To reach that goal, however, much will have to happen, including finalizing the plan, discussions with both faculty and classified union representatives and private meetings between Lambert and those employees who could be affected by the reductions.

 

While the college will have an announced budget-reduction plan on March 12, that doesn’t mean it will be set in stone.

 

“There are a number of things that could change and impact the plan,” Campbell said. Those things include getting a specific budget-cut target from the State Board of Community and Technical Colleges. That can’t happen until the Legislature passes a budget and the session end is scheduled for March 11. Potential federal funding or new state taxes may change the lawmakers’ equation. Personal choices by employees including retirements, resignations and those with position “bumping rights” can also change who is affected by the cuts.

 

Also, there will be an opportunity for those impacted by the cuts to speak again with President Lambert.

 

“A lot of thought and work will have been done by that point, but if there is a compelling reason, or perhaps we just got something wrong, of course we would want to revisit that,” Lambert said. “No one wants to do this, but we do want to do it the best way we can for our employees and students.”

 

Anticipating the likelihood of changes, there will be another all-campus meeting at 12:30 p.m., Friday, April 2, to update the campus on how reductions are being implemented and present any adjustments that are known at that point.

 

SCC/Jim Hills

* SCC collaborates with LWTC to fill position

IR?

Institutional research puts together data developing, organizing, and coordinating activities necessary for institutional effectiveness measurements, policy governance metrics, outcomes assessment, compliance with accreditation standards and strategic planning.

 

Among other things, the assistant director position will:

  • Provide assistance and counsel in analysis and interpretation of academic and administrative data
  • Coordinate with LWTC staff to ensure that data sets provided support SCC’s overall institutional research function, assessment and planning
  • Help coordinate the identification, implementation, and review of institutional and educational effectiveness indices
  • Provide data-driven recommendations pertaining to SCC progress towards identified goals/outcomes and assess alignment with current and future resource allocation
  • Represent the College, with the LWTC team, in the community and with professional organizations, state boards, commissions and other agencies
Shoreline Community College and Lake Washington Technical College are taking an innovative approach to meeting the needs of both schools.

 

“Shoreline and Lake Washington will be collaborating in the area of institutional research,” SCC President Lee Lambert said Wednesday, February 17, 2010. “Institutional research is critical in making the best decisions possible for each school.”

 

The innovative part is that the colleges are building an institutional research team that will focus on both institutions. On Wednesday, SCC posted a job titled “Assistant Director for Institutional Effectiveness and Strategic Planning.” The position will be a member of an institutional research team comprised of staff from both colleges.

 

While the position will report to SCC’s Vice President of Academic Affairs John Backes, it will also work in close collaboration with LWTC’s Research and Development department which includes an executive director and several supporting positions. An interagency agreement between the schools will enable data sharing so that the team members can serve both schools.

 

SCC’s position has been vacant since the retirement in 2009 of former Director of Institutional Research, Jim James.

 

“This is an effort by both schools to improve services,” Lambert said, adding that the cost for each college will be about the same as before.

 

* SCC asks employees for budget input

Budget thinking caps

 

Here is information and background material that may be helpful when thinking about potential budget reductions at Shoreline Community College. Ideas may be dropped off in red suggestion boxes that will be distributed around campus and submitted anonymously via and online form at: http://anonymous.shoreline.edu/
anonymouscomment.htm

 

Reduction timeline

  • Feb. 11-18: Campus-wide budget input sought
  • Feb. 12: Brown-bag Q&A lunch, noon-1 p.m., PUB Quiet Dining Room
  • Feb. 19-26: PSET reviews input, crafts reduction plan; discussion with labor representatives
  • March 1-12: Potentially impacted employees contacted by President Lambert
  • March 12: All-Campus Meeting, 12:30-2 p.m., PUB Main Dining Room; present reduction plan
  • April 2: All-Campus Meeting, 12:30-2 p.m., PUB Main Dining Room; present progress and any adjustments to reduction plan

Assumptions

  • Reduction range of $1.5 million to $2 million in state-appropriated funds
  • There are approximately 10 vacant positions that would likely remain vacant
  • Freeze restrictions in place through June, 2011
  • No special exemptions to freeze restrictions would be granted by the state
  • Current labor contracts remain in effect
  • Serve the same number of student FTEs
  • Decision and transparency guidelines are used
  • Strategic objectives used

Documents

Shoreline Community College officials are ready for the next step in the process that would cut between $1.5 million and $2 million from the college budget: Asking college employees for their ideas.

 

“The Legislature is still working, but we can’t wait for them to come up with a final budget number,” SCC President Lee Lambert said. “The Legislature doesn’t always work on our timetable. We have to come up with a plan we think will be close and then be able to make adjustments if we have to.”

 

One big adjustment has already been made.

 

“We started our process assuming that state economic forecasts are correct and that higher education would face cuts in each of the next three years,” Lambert said. “We said, ‘OK, then let’s look at what that might mean for the college, craft a three-year plan and restructure for the future.’ We were making good progress, but the spending freeze bill really takes much of that planning off the plate.”

 

The bill, ESHB 2921, has passed both the House and Senate and is headed to Gov. Gregoire’s desk. It includes much of the same spending restrictions imposed by the Legislature during a four month period last year. This time, however, the freeze would be for about 16 months, through June 30, 2011.

 

“The freeze means we can’t replace people who leave, can’t create new positions that might be needed in a restructure and really are forced into taking a short-term look at a long-term problem,” Lambert said. “There are exceptions and things we can do, but in many ways, our hands are tied.”

 

The next step for Shoreline, Lambert said, is to ask everyone in the college community for their ideas on how and where to make budget cuts.

 

“Based on Gov. Gregoire’s proposed budget and information since then from Olympia, we think the cut for Shoreline could be between $1.5 million and $2 million for next year,” Lambert said.

 

“The vice presidents have taken a first look at how they might make cuts that get us into that range and now we're at the point where campus input is essential to moving forward with this process," he said. "Before any decisions are made, I want to hear from anyone who has ideas or thoughts about how to address this budget challenge."

 

Deans and directors are being asked to schedule meetings with faculty and employees to help facilitate discussion. Also, a brown bag Q&A lunch session has been scheduled for noon-1 p.m., Friday, Feb. 12.

 

Lambert said it would be helpful if input honored the guidelines provided by a joint work group of the college’s strategic planning and budget committees. The vice presidents have added strategic objectives to the guidelines, creating a base for considering budget reductions.

 

Lambert acknowledged that there are many ways to make cuts, but that secondary implications and impacts must also be considered.

 

“Take furloughs for example,” he said. “Sounds good at first glance, but what if we voluntarily use furloughs and then the state comes in and mandates additional furloughs? Also, I worry that once we give that away, it might never come back. Furloughs may be a solution, but we have to consider the potential for unintended consequences from all options.”

 

Lambert said the input would be gathered and “every comment will be seen by me and every vice president.” The vice presidents and Lambert will then craft a reduction plan and speak with union representatives. Lambert would then speak with individual employees whose positions would be affected.

 

“There is nothing good about making cuts,” Lambert said. “However, we can try to do them in the most thoughtful and sensitive manner possible.”

* Four Days to Change the World - SCC Global Affairs Center to host symposium on international humanitarian assistance

The Global Affairs Center and International Programs at Shoreline Community College is hosting a symposium on international humanitarian assistance on the main campus the week of February 22, 2010.  The focus will be on the work of local non-government organizations, with evening speakers, daytime events and an engagement fair taking place.  All events are free.

Evening speakers on February 22, 23 and 24.

·         Monday, February 22, 6:30 p.m.  Arlene Mitchell, Senior Program Officer, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, PUB 9208 (Quiet Dining Room).

·         Tuesday, February 23, 6:30 p.m., Heidi Peterson, National Director of Leadership Gifts, CARE USA, PUB 9208 (Quiet Dining Room).

·         Wednesday, February 24, 6:30 p.m.  “Once in Afghanistan,” documentary viewing and discussion with former Peace Corps volunteers who participated in small-pox eradication campaign in 1969 in Afghanistan.  PUB 9208 (Quiet Dining Room).

Daytime events on February 23, 24 and 25.

Seven sessions will occur on February 23, 24 and 25 that focus on the work of a particular groups and organizations.  Participants will include representatives from Amigos de las Americas, Fabric of Life, Global Neighbors, Global Partnerships, PATH, the Peace Corps, and the Rural Development Institution. 

More details on participants, time and place (all sessions will occur on campus in the PUB, but the exact room will vary) will be announced in later press releases and on the Global Affairs Center website (www.shoreline.edu/gac) as they become available.

Engagement Fair on February 25

A drop-in event will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday, February 25 in the PUB (9208), where representatives of these and other humanitarian assistance organizations will be on hand to share volunteer opportunities and details on how to become involved. 

For more information about the program, visit the Global Affairs Center web site at: http://www.shoreline.edu/gac/internl_human_assit_program.aspx.

Shoreline Community College is located at 16101 Greenwood Avenue North, just west of Aurora Avenue and north of Seattle city limits.  Public parking is available on campus.  Enter through the main gate at Innis Arden Way.  Public and event parking is across from the bus stop.  Evening parking is free.  Daytime parking requires a pass which is free and can be obtained from the receptionist in the 1000 building (across from the visitor parking lot).  

For directions to the college and information, please visit the college web site at http://www.shoreline.edu/collegemaps.aspx. 

The mission of the Global Affairs Center is to encourage engagement on global economic, development and social issues that contributes to sound policy, global peace and prosperity.  The goal is to present programs that are timely and relevant to students and community partners.

* SCC officials prepare for budget freeze

Pending legislation in Olympia is affecting the budget thinking and planning at Shoreline Community College.

 

“It looks like the legislators will freeze spending,” SCC President Lee Lambert said Monday, Feb. 1, 2010. Lambert and all college presidents received an e-mail memo late Monday from Chris Reykdal, deputy director for the State Board of Community and Technical Colleges, outlining several budget-related bills. “Taking the freeze into consideration changes how we will approach budgeting for the anticipated reductions in funding from the state.”

 

College officials had been working toward a budget plan that looked out three years and included restructuring to better position the college for what appear to be permanently lower levels of state support. While some shifts may still be considered, others are made impossible by the freeze, Lambert said.

 

“For example, a three-year plan could have included combining some jobs and creating new positions to put us in a better position to serve students. We can’t do that now,” Lambert said, adding that if enacted, the freeze could be in effect for 15 months. “While there are some exceptions, in many cases, if we lose a job, we won’t be able to fill it for a long time. This takes away much of our flexibility.”

 

The goal now will be to hit the state’s target number for Shoreline and no more, Lambert said. That number is estimated to be $1.5-1.7 million, but the exact target won’t be known until Gov.Gregoire signs the budget, perhaps in March.

 

As the college budgeting process moves forward, Lambert said one thing that won’t change is the commitment to the criteria set forth by a subgroup of the Budget and Strategic Planning committees. “That’s good work and it still applies,” he said.

 

Here is the memo sent by Chris Reykdal:

 

Three expenditure freeze bills that will have potential impacts to your purchasing, hiring and salary decisions for the remainder of the biennium are moving very quickly through the Legislature.  I wanted to give you an idea of the freeze provisions as they currently stand, but please keep in mind that the bills are still being amended and are still subject to change. 

 

The bills are intended to result in savings, but it is important to note that they do not add to the general budget reductions we are likely to receive in the 2010 supplemental budget.  Instead, they are legislatively mandated means of achieving the overall savings. 

 

Salary Freeze – SB 6382

 

This bill extends the current salary freeze to June 30, 2011.  It freezes all salaries except for increases based on demonstrated retention difficulties and increases provided in collective bargaining agreements applicable to faculty, technical college classified staff, and civil service employees.  The salary freezes apply regardless of fund source.  Any salary increases provided under the exceptions must be reported to the legislature in July 2011. 

 

We are still analyzing how the provisions of this bill interact with existing faculty agreements, appropriations act language, and statutes.   

 

This bill has passed the Senate and the House, but was amended by the House.  Differences will need to be worked out in conference.  The bill has an emergency clause and takes effect as soon as the Governor signs it, so it is possible for this bill to become law within the week.

 

Compensation Savings (“Furlough Bill”) – SB 6503

 

This bill has passed the Senate and is up for executive session in the House Ways and Means Committee this afternoon.  The bill requires statewide compensation savings totaling $69 million between June 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011.  OFM is to spread the $69 million among the various state agencies and institutions of higher education based on each entity’s proportionate share of compensation expenditures. Compensation savings can be achieved through mandatory and voluntary temporary layoffs, reductions in workforce, reduced work hours, as well as voluntary retirement, separation and other incentive programs.  Savings resulting from temporary layoffs (furloughs) taken prior to the effective date of the bill can be counted toward the savings target, but other types of compensation savings achieved prior to June 1, 2010 do not count toward the target.  The bill states that it is the intent of the legislature that agencies strive to preserve family wage jobs by reducing the impact of temporary layoffs on lower-wage jobs.  Compensation savings must be from positions supported by General Fund-State and Education Legacy Trust Fund appropriations.  Exemptions include classroom instruction; operations not funded by state funds/tuition; campus police/security officers; employees needed to protect public assets; IT systems and safety.  The bill provides for collective bargaining over implementation.

 

We don’t have a number yet on our share of the $69 million, but we expect it to be somewhere between $2 million and $4 million based on our very rough estimates.  The compensation savings specified in the bill are NOT in addition to the general budget reductions. 

 

Additional Expenditure Freezes – HB 2921

 

This bill has passed the House but is still working its way through the Senate.  It would take effect 30 days after being signed by the Governor, so we could see this take effect sometime in March. 

 

This bill is similar to last year’s freeze bill.  The freezes apply only to expenditures made with state and tuition funds.  Exempt from the freeze are expenditures made with private grants, local funds, and federal grants.  The bill freezes: 

 

Hiring.  Exemptions are enumerated in the bill and include higher education positions directly related to academic programs; positions funded with grants or local funds (anything other than state or tuition funds); positions filled with student workers; campus police and security; emergency management and response; positions related to student health care and counseling. 

 

New Personal Service Contracts.  Exemptions:  contracts funded exclusively with private or federal grants; where the costs are necessary to receive or maintain federal funds; and where the costs are funded by grants or local funds (anything other than state or tuition funds). 

 

Equipment Purchases over $5,000.  Exemptions include purchases made with grants or local funds (anything other than state or tuition funds). 

 

Out-of-state travel and training.  Exempts travel necessary for receiving or maintaining federal funding and travel funded with grants or local funds (anything other than state or tuition funds). 

 

Exceptions can be granted by OFM for the critically necessary work of an agency.  The legislature must be notified prior to an exception becoming effective and must be posted on OFM’s website.

 

Again, these bills are fluid and much detail needs to be worked out.  We know this will impact your planning efforts on campus for the current fiscal year and beyond so we will update you as things crystallize about these bills.