Prospective StudentsCurrent StudentsBusinessesCommunityDistanceA to Z Index
TSS Today
News Home Search
* High School Transition Program - Community Integration Program and Shoreline Public Schools make the perfect team

Although it’s common knowledge that new ideas and new opportunities are key players on the road to success, sometimes “moving forward” requires bringing back ideas and practices from the past – as was the case with a partnership between Shoreline Community College and the Shoreline School District.   

 

Approximately 15 years ago the college had a partnership with the school district to offer an off-campus transition program for young adults (18-21) with intellectual and/or developmental challenges.  After completing four years of high school, students had the opportunity to continue taking courses via the High School Transition program that would help them with independent living and vocational skills. One of the classes was held at the college.  

 

The idea to bring back the high school transition program had been brewing for some time.  The actual partnership idea between Shoreline and the [Shoreline School] district was actually scribbled on a napkin over coffee.  Kim Thompson, Director of the Office of Special Services
Kim Thompson, Director of the Office of Special Services at the college said the original partnership was very informal.  “It was basically an agreement for students to use campus facilities to make salsa, which they sold to local restaurants.”  Thompson said the idea as informal as it was, provided a great opportunity for the students to grow.  “They got normal social experiences here – and it helped them to feel good about themselves…taking a class at the college.”

 

“Without the partnership,” Thompson said, “students would never have gotten the personal growth they experienced while taking classes at the college and being a part of the community – and they get to take the journey together. The ability for the students to not only be on campus to take classes but to interact with college students is a huge bonus for these kids.” 

 

Unfortunately after only two years, the program was closed due to red tape. The memory of its merits did not fade, however, and thanks to a few dedicated people, it was reinstated in 2006.    

 

In 2004, over a cup of coffee at a local market, Thompson shared a conversation with a friend about bringing the transition program back, but this time providing more opportunities such as access to college services and activities.   

 

“What if they had library cards and got to use the computer labs,” she asked Linda Bow, Department Chair of Directed Studies at Shorecrest High School. “And what if they could transition into the CIP (Community Integration Program)?”  The two agreed that the new program should be designed to support students becoming as independent as possible.  Together, they scribbled a plan on a napkin.

 

Students enrolled in the Shoreline Public School system who have completed high school via an Individualized Education Plan, are eligible for classes designed to provide them with daily living, community access, and vocational skills. 
Thompson and Bow were not the only ones to like the idea.  Vice President of Academic Affairs, John Backes also wanted the partnership reinstated and was instrumental in making sure that happened.  In 2006, it was reinstated for a trial period, and after a successful year, the contract was extended for two more years. The partnership is now in its fourth year.   

 

Today students enrolled in the Community Based Transition Program (new program, new name) no longer go to the high school -- all classes are held at the college – and they have library cards and access to all college events and activities.

 

“The interaction with college students and ability to use the college facilities like the PUB, library, cafeteria and the gym are equally important to the growth of these kids on the academic side,” Backes said.  “We needed to ensure that the students got access to the same services that other students had.”

 

One of those services, lead instructor, Jennifer Given-Helms said, is the opportunity to eat lunch in the PUB.  “Eating their lunches in the PUB provides a natural opportunity for our students to interact with other college students.”  So does studying in the library or even waiting at the bus stop.

 

Life skills.  Job skills.  Independence skills.  That’s what students in the Community Based Transition Program get.  Jennifer Given-Helms
Students take two classes four days a week, including social skills, banking and budgeting, community resources, yoga, person-centered planning, disability disclosure, pre-vocational skills, meal planning and cooking.  Each student takes classes that are most appropriate for their particular needs via individualized education plans.  Fridays are committed to excursions which provide additional opportunities for exploration of their communities and time to practice their independent skills such as riding Metro buses.  

 

2.jpg“The merits of the program are many,” Given-Helms said.  “The idea was to prepare the students to be productive, integral and valued members of society in collaboration with families and the community.” 

 

Vocational internships are an important part of the program.  During their last year in the program, (because the program is under the school district domain, eligibility ends when students turn 21), students participate in the School to Work program and work one-on-one with an employment specialist who helps them develop job skills and find employment.  Currently students choose from 35 businesses to volunteer such as Central Market, the Dale Turner YMCA, Edmonds Boys and Girls Club and Top Foods. The majority of students elect to move into the workforce, taking part-time jobs at one of the locations at which they completed an internship.  

 

Students also get help on basic skills that will help them in their jobs, such as attendance, reliability, customer service, self initiation, and communication with co-workers and supervisors.

 

“It’s a great plan,” Given-Helms said, explaining that by the time they turn 21 they have experienced up to six different internships.  “They basically have six options for employment.”  

Marsha Threlkeld, a consultant and trainer with the Washington Initiative for Supported Employment, says the Shoreline program is working extremely well.

“Nationally the average in placing students with intellectual disabilities into employment the time they exit school is about 15 percent.  The rate for these students who attend the program at Shoreline Community College is approximately 60 percent, making it four times the national average.”

 

Approximately one student per year decides to stay at Shoreline and move into the college’s Community Integration Program, which is what Cameron Chapman did. Chapman, who is deaf and has cerebral palsy, said he wanted to enter the program because it would help him get a job.  His instructors both agreed as did his mother that he would benefit from additional training before trying to find work.   

 

Chapman comes to campus twice a week to participate in a specialized curriculum designed specifically for students with developmental disabilities and with a focus on job skills. 

 

Rose.JPG“Cameron is really happy here,” Program Manager Rosemary Dunne says.  “He is getting more independent,” she says, adding that he is learning how to be responsible for a schedule, work in small groups, and to develop relationships with- and interact with the same students on a daily basis.  He also gets lots of practice using his ASL skills, a skill he will need in the work force.  

 

It is clear that Chapman wants to be a part of the college community.  Dunne says he works hard to adapt and engage with other students.  He is active in the ASL Club and attends college events.  An interpreter joins him so that he can fully experience the events.  He greatly enjoys the annual musical performed by music and drama students.

 

“Cameron is a friendly, curious guy who likes to engage with people,” Dunne says.  Earlier, while he was completing the CBT Program, he worked with the gardening crew at the college, helping to keep the campus clean.  He was proud of his work and proud to be a student here.  “He knows quite a lot of people on campus – he has a long history here. 

 

“In fact,” Dunne says, “Cameron has helped us grow, too.  He has brought good energy to the program and as a result of him being with us, we are all learning sign.”

 

Although Chapman is no longer in the HIT program, he continues to keep in touch with, and visit the friends he made there.  He is one of three who graduated last year.  Fourteen are still in the transition program.

 

Currently 27 students are enrolled in the program; a 300 percent increase from the original nine students.  It is still the only program of its kind in the state. 

 

Threlkeld says she frequently highlights the program at regional and national conferences, and on several occasions, invited Given-Helms to co-present, providing details about the SCC program.

 

“Shoreline’s program is highly regarded, Threlkeld says. “The public perceives the program to be of the highest caliber, in fact a model program across the country.”

 

Each year the graduating students enjoy a graduation ceremony.  “The last two years it’s been on campus,” Backes said.  “And they love it!”

 

* State Board OKs budget; no changes for Shoreline

LINKS

The budget approved Thursday, June 23, 2011 by the State Board of Community and Technical Colleges may contain less money, but at least there are no big surprises.

“The State Board staff gave us preliminary numbers on June 9 for our planning purpose here at Shoreline,” said Daryl Campbell, Vice President for Administrative Services. “The budget they approved on Thursday matched thankfully those preliminary numbers.”

For 2011-12, the total budget for all 34 community and technical colleges is $533.36 million. Shoreline’s slice of that is $18.4 million, the state’s part of the total $37.8 million in revenue expected by the college in the coming year.

Because of the continuing economic issues, the recent state legislative session was stretched out with a special session. That delay upset the timing of budget approvals for the State Board as well as colleges such as Shoreline. On Wednesday, Shoreline’s Board of Trustees went ahead and approved a budget based on the June 9 preliminary figures. At the time, Campbell told the trustees that should anything be substantively different, a budget revision would be brought to them at their regularly scheduled September meeting.

Late Thursday, State Board staff confirmed that the approved budget for the state system includes the same specific college allocations as those shared on June 9. 

“The State Board’s action means that now we won’t have to adjust Shoreline's budget, at least for that reason,” Campbell said. “Let’s cross our fingers that the economy continues its slow recovery and there aren’t any other reasons to revisit our budget.”

SCC/Jim Hills

* SCC Trustees approve budget for 2011-12

RobinAranas.jpg

SCC photo

Student Body President Robin Aranas (with plaque) is honored for his service by the Shoreline Community College Board of Trustees (from left) Shoubee Liaw, Roger Olstad, Jerry Smith, Gidget Terpstra and Phil Barrett.

Shoreline Community College will go into the next year with less money coming from the state, more money coming from students and fewer employees.

“You can see that over the past three years, the percentage of the college budget from the state allocation is getting smaller while the percentage covered by student tuition and fees is getting larger,” said Daryl Campbell, Vice President for Administrative Services. Campbell was speaking to the college Board of Trustees at the June 22 regular meeting. The trustees approved the overall budget of $37.8 million, but not unanimously and even some of the yes votes weren’t happy about it.

The budget includes a 12 percent average tuition increase, an increase set by the state Legislature in the recent special session and approved by Gov. Chris Gregoire. That reality didn’t assuage Shoreline Trustee Shoubee Liaw’s concerns over piling additional financial burdens on students.

“Can the trustees vote to approve something less than 12 percent,” Liaw asked somewhat rhetorically. “I think it is just morally wrong. We’re committing (students) to debt. We’re beating them with a stick and then taking their blood.”

Board Chair Jerry Smith said he would reluctantly vote for the tuition increase included in the budget, but agreed with Liaw.

“Increasing tuition at a place like the University of Washington is one thing, but raising tuition at a community college is way worse,” Smith said. “The community college system is at the forefront of the national agenda right now. To raise tuition on community college students is very objectionable to me.”

When it came time to vote, Liaw was the lone holdout, with Smith praising her action, saying, “I’m glad you voted against this.”

During a study session before the regular meeting, Campbell presented a chart that showed the shifting funding burden.

In 2009-10, Campbell said, the unrestricted state allocation accounted for 51 percent of the college budget. The next year that had slipped to 48 percent and for the coming year the figure is 44 percent. In contrast, the student tuition portion has risen from 34 percent, to 35 percent to 40 percent over the same three years. He also pointed out that the category called local funds, primarily student-paid fees, has also grown from 8.9 percent, to 9.5 percent to 11.3 percent of the operating budget during that same period.

And it was the issue of student fees that became the most debated topic of the meeting.

The trustees approved a plan that combines five technology-related fees currently unevenly applied to students into one college technology fee that will apply to almost all students.  The consolidated fee will be applied at $6 per credit with cap of $80 per student per quarter.

“Technology is no longer an add-on, it is a basic part of a college education,” said eLearning Director Ann Garnsey-Harter during the study session.

Student government leaders at the meeting didn’t disagree with the importance of technology, but they didn’t like the implementation of the fee.  “We think this should be put on hold until next year when students can have a complete discussion of the fee and how it should be applied, who should pay,” said Robin Aranas, President of the student body.

Paul Bartell, student Minister of Records, said that student government has enough funds to cover some of the computer-lab portion of the college expenses. “We could use student money for the labs while studying how to better understand how to more equitably pay for technology,” Bartell said. “These things need to be funded and well, but it is a lot of money and it needs to be clear how it is going to be spent.”

Garnsey-Harter said the plan for the consolidated fee does include a prioritized spending plan. In their ultimate approval, the trustees also took her suggestion that the fee be implemented for one year, include quarterly reports to the trustees on implementation and require a collaborative effort with students and staff on how to move forward next year.

The trustees also approved fee increases for the Health Informatics and Information Management program, the nursing and dental hygiene programs and the Parent-Child Center

Despite the tuition and fee increases, the approved budget is balanced with about $2.9 million less coming from state and required personnel cuts.

College officials had to start planning for reductions long before the Legislature and Governor finished their work. Initial estimates of about $3.1 million would’ve meant even deeper cuts that the actual ending number. Along with significant contractual concessions by faculty union members, some positions slated for reduction were able to be restored, but people are still losing their jobs.

The heaviest cuts are coming in full-time faculty positions, where seven positions are eliminated. Eight positions are being restored from the original cut list, there are three retirements and one temporary position is not being renewed. Vice President for Academic Affairs John Backes has said that while the full-time positions are being cut, part-time faculty will be used to fill some of the classes that would have otherwise been taught. The ability to do that to a greater degree is one of the faculty contract concessions.

Among administrators, two positions are being eliminated, three are being downgraded - including one vice president - and three are reduced in hours. For classified employees, seven vacant positions are eliminated, two retirements and one is shifted to non-state funding.

In the end, the budget was approved, but only contingent on expected action by the State Board of Community and Technical Colleges. The State Board was scheduled to approve its budget, alogn with specific allocations to all 34 community and technical colleges at its meeting on June 23.

Should the State Board's actions be different than expected, a revised budget would be presented to the Shoreline trustees at their September meeting, Campbell said.

SCC/Jim Hills

* Shoreline reorganizes administrative structure, functions

As a consequence of continuing state budget reductions, Shoreline Community College is reorganizing the administrative structure of the college.

“Let there be no mistake, for a college of our size and program mix, these moves are not optimal,” Shoreline President Lee Lambert said. “Neither are any of the other changes being forced on Shoreline and the rest of the community and technical college system by state budget cuts.

“However, given the difficult circumstances, I believe these moves will allow Shoreline to continue to meet the needs of students by providing its customary high level of education, training and services.”

The central administrative change is a reduction from four vice presidents to three, but the reduction has wide ranging implications for other positions at the institution.

Shoreline’s current vice-presidential lineup includes: Vice President for Academic Affairs John Backes, Vice President of Administrative Services Daryl Campbell, Vice President for Human Resources and Legal Affairs Stephen Smith and Vice President for Student Success Tonya Drake.

As of July 1, Drake’s position will become Dean of Students. Many responsibilities of her current vice-president position will be parceled out to others, including:

  • Enrollment services and financial aid move under Administrative Services
  • Athletics moves to the Dean of Health Occupations and Physical Education and Business
  • International Programs will be temporarily overseen by Lambert

The new Dean of Students position will join all other Dean positions under the VP of Academic Affairs and have responsibility for:

  • The Center for Equity, Engagement and Service, Counseling Services and High School Programs
  • Student Leadership Center and Student Government
  • Career Education Options (CEO)
  • Office of Special Services
  • General student complaints
  • Student discipline
  • Behavior Intervention Team

Other moves include the campus rentals position from the Office of Advancement to Administrative Services

“I’m very pleased that Dr. Drake will continue to assist Shoreline students and to have her considerable skills and expertise engaged directly with instruction as we transition the college toward this new structure,” Backes said. Drake will join with Dr. Norma Goldstein, Dean of Humanities, in providing leadership to the college’s accreditation processes and reports.

The move of enrollment services, financial aid and rentals to Campbell’s area is a consolidation of primarily business-related functions under one vice president.

Lambert acknowledged that having his position directly supervising a department is unusual, but that it is a reflection of the importance of International Programs.

“Internationalization is a focal point for Shoreline and the growth of International Programs is one of our strategic initiatives to help the college deal with less and less state support,” Lambert said. “Bringing more international students to Shoreline has a positive economic impact on the school and the surrounding community. I’m looking forward to working closely with Executive Director Thalia Saplad to make this happen.”

Lambert said his involvement isn’t intended to be permanent, but that he would stay close to International Programs for the next 12-18 months as recruitment, support and marketing efforts ramp up. Shoreline now has about 600 students from countries around the world. In August, 2010, Lambert announced a goal of increasing that number to 1,000 within the next four to five years.

“The presence of International students helps the college continue to provide top-flight programs to all students,” Lambert said. “Higher education is also a valuable export for the state of Washington as identified by Gov. Gregoire.”

* Shoreline reorganizes administrative structure, functions

As a consequence of continuing state budget reductions, Shoreline Community College is reorganizing the administrative structure of the college.

“Let there be no mistake, for a college of our size and program mix, these moves are not optimal,” Shoreline President Lee Lambert said. “Neither are any of the other changes being forced on Shoreline and the rest of the community and technical college system by state budget cuts.

“However, given the difficult circumstances, I believe these moves will allow Shoreline to continue to meet the needs of students by providing its customary high level of education, training and services.”

The central administrative change is a reduction from four vice presidents to three, but the reduction has wide ranging implications for other positions at the institution.

Shoreline’s current vice-presidential lineup includes: Vice President for Academic Affairs John Backes, Vice President of Administrative Services Daryl Campbell, Vice President for Human Resources and Legal Affairs Stephen Smith and Vice President for Student Success Tonya Drake.

As of July 1, Drake’s position will become Dean of Students. Many responsibilities of her current vice-president position will be parceled out to others, including:

Enrollment services and financial aid move under Administrative Services

Athletics moves to the Dean of Health Occupations and Physical Education and Business

International Programs will be temporarily overseen by Lambert

The new Dean of Students position will join all other Dean positions under the VP of Academic Affairs and have responsibility for:

  • The Center for Equity, Engagement and Service, Counseling Services and High School Programs
  • Student Leadership Center and Student Government
  • Career Education Options (CEO)
  • Office of Special Services
  • General student complaints
  • Student discipline
  • Behavior Intervention Team

Other moves include the campus rentals position from the Office of Advancement to Administrative Services

“I’m very pleased that Dr. Drake will continue to assist Shoreline students and to have her considerable skills and expertise engaged directly with instruction as we transition the college toward this new structure,” Backes said. Drake will join with Dr. Norma Goldstein, Dean of Humanities, in providing leadership to college’s accreditation processes and reports.

The move of enrollment services, financial aid and rentals to Campbell’s area is a consolidation of primarily business-related functions under one vice president.

Lambert acknowledged that having his position directly supervising a department is unusual, but that it is a reflection of the importance of International Programs.

“Internationalization in is a focal point for Shoreline and the growth of International Programs is one of our strategic initiatives to help the college deal with less and less state support,” Lambert said. “Bringing more international students to Shoreline has a positive economic impact on the school and the surrounding community. I’m looking forward to working closely with Executive Director Thalia Saplad to make this happen.”

Lambert said his involvement isn’t intended to be permanent, but that he would stay close to International Programs for the next 12-18 months as recruitment, support and marketing efforts ramp up. Shoreline now has about 600 students from countries around the world. In August, 2010, Lambert announced a goal of increasing that number to 1,000 within the next four to five years.

“The presence of International students helps the college continue to provide top-flight programs to all students,” Lambert said. “Higher education is also a valuable export for the state of Washington as identified by Gov. Gregoire.”

* President Lambert hears Obama support manufacturing jobs and community colleges

ObamaVirginiaPatch.jpg

Alexandria.Patch.com

President Barack Obama speaks Wednesday, June 8, 2011, at Norther Virginia Community College. The event was attended by Shoreline Community College President Lee Lambert at the invitation of the White House.

Shoreline Community College is taking a leadership role in the resurgence of manufacturing employment that is critical to America’s economic future.

Links

“As President Obama reinforced today, manufacturing is a key component of the economy, and key to manufacturing are well-educated and well-trained employees,” Shoreline Community College President Lee Lambert said.

At the invitation of the White House, Lambert attended Obama’s June 8, 2011 visit to Northern Virginia Community College. At the event, President Obama announced a major expansion of Skills for America’s Future, an industry-led initiative that partners with community colleges to support their role in workforce development strategies, job training programs and job placements.

“Last year, we launched Skills for America’s Future to bring together companies and community colleges around a simple idea: making it easier for workers to gain new skills will make America more competitive in the global economy,” Obama said in a prepared statement. “Today, we are announcing a number of partnerships that will help us make this a reality, by opening doors to new jobs for workers, and helping employers find the trained people they need to compete against companies around the world.”

Lambert said Shoreline is working to establish industry, government and education partnerships that can help students.

“When we reach out to companies like Boeing, our automotive partners, Snap On Tools and Amgen; to groups such as the National Association of Manufacturers, the  Puget Sound Automobile Dealers and our many advisory councils; to our fellow institutions of higher education, it is so that we can better meet the needs of our students,” Lambert said. “President Obama’s words today reinforce the importance of those efforts.”

Shoreline Community College is working with the key partners of Skills for America’s Future, including: the Aspen Institute, which originated the initiative; the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) and The Manufacturing Institute, the affiliated non-profit of the National Association of NAM.

Shoreline has two programs that are benefitting from grant support by the Aspen Institute, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and others.

The college’s General Service Technician program - a three-quarter-long, entry-level automotive technician training program – has received Aspen Institute support. Gates and The Manufacturing Institute support the CNC Machining program with funding that puts a “career navigator” in the classroom. The career navigator helps students connect with potential employers, addresses other life issues outside the classroom and even provides follow-up support after the student leaves school.

“The program works,” said Susan Hoyne, Dean of Science at Shoreline Community College, who oversees both the automotive and manufacturing programs. Hoyne said that 100 percent of this spring’s CNC (computer-numeric controlled) Machining graduates have jobs in the field.

Joining Shoreline as pilot schools for the program are Forsyth Technical Community College, North Carolina; Lorain County Community College, Ohio; and The Alamo Colleges, Texas.

Hoyne said Shoreline’s CNC Machining program is also breaking ground in another item on President Obama’s list: Skills certifications.

“Our program was the first in the state to be certified by the National Institute for Metalworking Skills and our students have passed that certification,” Hoyne said. “That certification, validated by a third party, does two things: It lets employers know what skills they are hiring and it lets students take their certification anywhere in the country.”

Shoreline is also one of 20 community and technical colleges in Washington that are aligning their manufacturing programs with the needs of Boeing and the rest of the state’s aerospace industry.

In conjunction with The Center of Excellence for Aerospace and Advanced Materials Manufacturing at Everett Community College, Shoreline and the other schools are working to assure that skills learned in the classroom can quickly be turned into employment.

Director Mary Kaye Bredeson said the center’s mission is simple: To help aerospace and advanced manufacturing industries in Washington increase their competitiveness not only nationally but globally.

“Boeing has told us they have a tremendous need now and into the future for trained employees,” Bredeson said. “In meeting their needs and the needs of other aerospace and advanced manufacturing companies, we’re also meeting the needs of our students and our state.”

Shoreline President Lambert said the experience at Northern Virginia Community College was important.

“To hear and see the President speak of the critical importance of what we’re doing to help students, industry, the state and the country is very reaffirming,” Lambert said. “It is clear we’re heading in the right direction.”

* Yoda and Princess Leia attend Classified Staff Social

Photos of Darth Vader, ET and Mork and Mindy lined the walls of the quiet dining room in the PUB yesterday. Yoda, Princess Leia, a Jedi knight and a space alien visited with their friends from across campus. The characters, although some would say "were the real deal," were actually classified staff members who dressed the part for the theme of this year's 13th Annual Classified Staff Social -- Galactic Adventures in Space.

Annie.jpgStaff commiserated on a challenging trivia contest, with Angela Hughes earning the most points; and Ann Martin-Cummins was only 48 Reese's Pieces short of guessing the more than 2,000 chocolates in a jar. Martin-Cummins also took home the Best Costume title, with Lynn Yaw and Kathy Langer also winning "BC" prizes -- Martin-Cummins was bedazzled to say the least, claiming to be a B-movie alien; Yaw was a Jedi knight and Langer was an SCC space alien, all done up in green with a green raffia headdress.

Emcee Kim Thompson, aka Obi-wan Kenobi brought laughs with her quick wit and dry sense of humor and introduced a short video prepared by members of the Classified Staff Committee, and VP for Academic Affairs John Backes, aka Captain Kirk, welcomed staff. Both elicited laughs and applause.

The annual event was hosted by President Lambert and the SCC President's Senior Executive Team to honor the hard work and accomplishments of staff. The luncheon was sponsored by the Puget Sound Automobile Dealers Association and the SCC Foundation. Enjoy a slideshow of the event.

* Students recognized at BOT meeting

It was all about the successes of our student athletes, business students and All-Academic students at the Board of Trustees meeting on Wednesday, May 25, 2011. 

 

SPORTS
Greg Turcott, head men’s basketball coach exhibited great pride when telling the Trustees about basketball player Sean Jones, who is heading to Hawaii to play ball next fall.  Jones, who played for O’Dea High School before coming to SCC, signed a grant-in-aid with Hawaii Pacific University to play basketball next season.  Coach Turcott went on to say that the 6'6" forward led the SCC team to a 13-13 record this year and fifth place in the NWAACC Northern Region.  Jones was also credited for the team’s 2009-10 NWAACC Northern Region Championship.

 

Head coach Lance Swehla told the Trustees about the great efforts of the Shoreline softball team, who finished the season second in the north division (17-7).  Swehla reported that the team produced five All-Conference players -- Melissa Kruse, (Idaho) Sophie Overlock-Pauley (Ballard) Laice Dedrick, (Montana) Whitney McFarland (Everett) and Amanda Olsen, (Shorewood), and that eight of the 13 players held above a 3.25 GPA.  Also, three of the six sophomores were on the NWAACC All Academic team. “The outgoing sophomores are planning on continuing their education and most of them will continue their athletic careers as well,” Swehla said.  He is currently recruiting student athletes for next year and has signed students from Montana, Lake Stevens, Monroe, Kamiak, Kentlake and Ballard.  

 

Tennis Coach Ray Bachmann commended the All Academic student athletes on the women’s and men’s tennis teams -- Christine Yang earned a 3.62, Blair Stone, a 3.98, Thinh Nguyen, a 3.43 and Sofoniyas Hagos, a 3.58 GPA. 

 

DECA
Steve McCloskey told the Trustees about the DECA students who rocked at a recent business competition.  Fourteen students competed at the Collegiate DECA ICDC (International Career Development Conference) in Orlando, Florida where  1,400 students from across the country competed  in events ranging from International Marketing, Entrepreneurship and Sports and Entertainment Marketing to Retail Management, Business Ethics and Hospitality.  Eleven of those students earned conference recognition and honors.

 

“Many of the students they competed against went to four-year colleges and universities,” McCloskey said.  He reported that five of the 14 SCC students were named in the Top Ten categories in their respective events:

 

  * Demi Hall and Sarah Jensen, National Finalists, Sports & Entertainment Marketing
  * John McCoy and Angela Krohn, National Finalists, Business to Business Marketing
  * Xiaolin Mo, National Finalist, Marketing Management

 

Five other students received ‘Honorable Mention’ status:

   * Amber Bonifas, Retail Management
   * Steve Kesting, Entrepreneurship
   * Robin Aranos, Human Resource Management
   * Jana Hecla and Kylie Williams, Sports & Entertainment Marketing
   * Travis Allende, Sales Management

 

Collegiate DECA has more than 13,000 members, serving its diverse international membership as a professional association, providing leadership and career opportunities to develop and enhance the business leaders of tomorrow.

 

DECA’s renowned Competitive Events program uses interviews, role plays, simulations and project reports to evaluate students’ marketing and management skills.  The competition includes 25 different events, judged by business professionals.

Serving as SCC DECA advisors are David Starr, Laura Portolese Dias, Stephen McCloskey and Mona Starr.
 
ALL ACADEMIC STUDENTS
Huy Minh Nguyen and Ching-Hsuan “Jeff” Ma were also recognized as All-Washington Academic Team students. Both had been recognized previously at a Board Meeting.